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Crop Progress, Virtual Tour Coming!

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Condition Descriptions:

 

Very Poor - Extreme degree of loss to yield potential, complete or near crop failure. Pastures provide very little or no feed considering the time of year. Supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Poor- Heavy degree of loss of yield potential which can be caused by excess soil moisture, drought, disease, etc. Pastures are providing only marginal feed for the current time of year. Some supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Fair - Less than normal crop condition. Yield loss is a possibility, but the extent is unknown. Pastures are providing generally adequate feed but still less than normal for the time of year.

Good - Yield prospects are normal or above normal. Moisture levels are adequate with only light disease and insect damage. Pastures are providing adequate feed supplies for the current time of year.

Excellent - Yield prospects are above normal, and crops are experiencing little or no stress. Pastures are supplying feed more than what is normally expected at the current time of year.

 

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According to NASS: “Warm temperatures and scattered moisture were observed across Montana during the past week, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Reporters in Judith Basin and Phillips counties stated hail and wind damage are being reported for some crops. Reporters in Broadwater and Roosevelt counties, reported moisture has delayed haying in certain areas, but that yields appear to be equal to or greater than the previous year. Topsoil moisture conditions for the state were 83 percent adequate to surplus, compared to 88 percent in the previous week and 77 percent the previous year. Subsoil moisture conditions were rated 81 percent adequate to surplus compared to 76 percent the previous year. Barley headed was estimated at 72 percent, ahead of the previous year at 53 percent. The barley crop has started to progress into the next stage, with an estimated 5 percent of the crop turning color, behind the previous year of 7 percent. Dry edible beans blooming is estimated at 58 percent complete. Dry edible peas blooming is estimated at 85 percent complete, slightly ahead of the previous year at 84 percent. Durum wheat booted is estimated at 80 percent complete, ahead of the previous year of 72 percent. The oilseed crop continues to progress well, with an estimated 65 percent of the flaxseed crop blooming, and mustard seed blooming is estimated at 74 percent complete. Canola blooming is estimated at 74 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 63 percent. Oats booted is estimated at 80 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 63 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 86 percent. Spring wheat booted is estimated at 88 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 83 percent. The first cutting for alfalfa and other hay is progressing well, despite some areas receiving moisture with hay on the ground. First cutting alfalfa is estimated at 63 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 48 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 77 percent. First cutting of other hay is estimated at 60 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 50 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 75 percent. Winter wheat was reported with 62 percent of the crop turning color, ahead of the previous year at 44 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 75 percent. Winter wheat conditions were rated as 78 percent good to excellent, compared to 66 percent this time last year.”

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The mood for most of us is optimistic. The fear is if winter hits early again. Other wise things are looking great across the treasure state. With conditions slightly behind the 5-year average we anticipate a longer harvest. The crops are looking BEAUTIFUL, granted some of these photos are of canola. Canola provides an excellent rotation in a wheat cropping system.

The committee has been working on a virtual tour with the state grain lab and a on farm visit. We are very excited about the opportunity that has arose.

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If you need help sourcing wheat and barley ingredients for your business, we would love to help. We will connect you with several options that provide numerous methods of delivery. All our wheat and barley suppliers can conduct negotiations virtually to fit your country or states regulations if needed, otherwise social distancing is not a problem out here =)

-Sam Anderson

WBC@mt.gov

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