X

Crop Progress, Golden Bobcat

Image

Condition Descriptions:

 

Very Poor - Extreme degree of loss to yield potential, complete or near crop failure. Pastures provide very little or no feed considering the time of year. Supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Poor- Heavy degree of loss of yield potential which can be caused by excess soil moisture, drought, disease, etc. Pastures are providing only marginal feed for the current time of year. Some supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Fair - Less than normal crop condition. Yield loss is a possibility, but the extent is unknown. Pastures are providing generally adequate feed but still less than normal for the time of year.

Good - Yield prospects are normal or above normal. Moisture levels are adequate with only light disease and insect damage. Pastures are providing adequate feed supplies for the current time of year.

Excellent - Yield prospects are above normal, and crops are experiencing little or no stress. Pastures are supplying feed more than what is normally expected at the current time of year.

 

Image

 

According to NASS: Warm temperatures were observed across Montana during the past week, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Reporters in Phillips, Stillwater and Sweet Grass counties reported grasshoppers are impacting the forage and grain crops. Topsoil moisture conditions for the state were 70 percent adequate to surplus, compared to 75 percent in the previous week and 74 percent the previous year. Subsoil moisture conditions were rated 77 percent adequate to surplus compared to 71 percent the previous year. Barley turning color was estimated at 58 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 48 percent. Dry edible peas harvest has begun, with an estimated 4 percent of the crop harvested, which is ahead of the previous year but behind the 5-year average of 26 percent. Lentil harvest started earlier than the previous year, with an estimated 2 percent of the crop harvested. Durum wheat headed is estimated at 87 percent complete, jumping ahead of the previous year of 85 percent. The Durum wheat crop continues to progress ahead of the previous year, with an estimated 27 percent of the crop in the coloring stage, compared to 23 percent last year. The oilseed crop is moving into the next stage, with an estimated 10 percent of the flaxseed crop turning color, and mustard seed turning color is estimated at 38 percent complete. Oats turning color is estimated at 28 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 18 percent. Spring wheat turning color is estimated at 47 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 22 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 48 percent. The first cutting for alfalfa and other hay is almost complete, with alfalfa harvested estimated at 87 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 82 percent. First cutting of other hay is estimated at 80 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 74 percent. Second cutting for alfalfa and other hay has begun in some areas, with 4 percent of alfalfa and 3 percent of other hay harvested. Winter wheat was reported with 93 percent of the crop turning color, ahead of the previous year at 84 percent. Harvest continues slowly for winter wheat, with an estimated 10 percent of the crop harvested, behind the 5-year average of 27 percent. Winter wheat conditions were rated as 83 percent good to excellent, compared to 55 percent this time last year. 

 

This past Thursday the state experienced thunderstorms and hail events. The extent of damage is still being tallied up, but I think the crop condition report may be an early depiction. It was not bad; spring wheat saw an uptick of 2% and barley 1% in the very poor condition. Which could also have to do with a grasshopper issue in the southern parts of Montana. The forecast is looking hot and dry, which is exactly what many farmers are hoping for. Often a hot finish to the small grains can potentially help increase protein content, dry out the crop for harvest and prevent pre harvest sprout.

 

Winter wheat is now 10% harvested, we will update you guys when we hear more about what is getting cut, and the quality they are seeing off the field.

 

 

Montana State University has done an amazing job through the covid challenges. MSU just released around 50 short educational videos about their current research efforts. I find the video above to be very interesting as soil acidification can often be overlooked. Please go check them out when you get the chance. There will also be a virtual event July 30th which should be interesting, all are welcome to attend.

 

https://agresearch.montana.edu/virtualfielddays.html.

 

Image

Image

 

In honor of MSU’s field days I was able to taste test the “Golden Bobcat”. Which I highly recommend. The amazing thing about this beer is all the ingredients came from a 28 mile radius of the brewery. Congrats on 125 years MSU! Our good friend Dave Tweet is a big University of Montana Grizzly fan and he told me to "pour that into a glass and crush the can". So i am posting this in honor of Dave =)

 

Below are photos of 2-row malting barley turning color near Belt MT. The green spring wheat is from our board member Adam Carney of Scobey MT. The spring wheat in his area is looking excellent.

 

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

 

 

 

If you need help sourcing wheat and barley ingredients for your business, we would love to help. We will connect you with several options that provide numerous methods of delivery. All our wheat and barley suppliers can conduct negotiations virtually to fit your country or states regulations if needed, otherwise social distancing is not a problem out here =)

-Sam Anderson

WBC@mt.gov

Previous Article July 2020 USDA Crop Production Report
Next Article Spotlight: Wheat and Barley Breeding in Montana
Print

Documents to download

Connect with MWBC on Social Media