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Crop Progress, HARVEST HAS BEGUN!

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Condition Descriptions:

 

Very Poor - Extreme degree of loss to yield potential, complete or near crop failure. Pastures provide very little or no feed considering the time of year. Supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Poor- Heavy degree of loss of yield potential which can be caused by excess soil moisture, drought, disease, etc. Pastures are providing only marginal feed for the current time of year. Some supplemental feeding is required to maintain livestock condition.

Fair - Less than normal crop condition. Yield loss is a possibility, but the extent is unknown. Pastures are providing generally adequate feed but still less than normal for the time of year.

Good - Yield prospects are normal or above normal. Moisture levels are adequate with only light disease and insect damage. Pastures are providing adequate feed supplies for the current time of year.

Excellent - Yield prospects are above normal, and crops are experiencing little or no stress. Pastures are supplying feed more than what is normally expected at the current time of year.

 

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According to NASS: “Warm temperatures and scattered moisture were observed across Montana during the past week, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Reporters in Phillips and Roosevelt counties reported some much-needed moisture was received last week. Topsoil moisture conditions for the state were 75 percent adequate to surplus, compared to 83 percent in the previous week and 81 percent the previous year. Subsoil moisture conditions were rated 79 percent adequate to surplus compared to 74 percent the previous year. Barley headed was estimated at 86 percent, ahead of the previous year at 80 percent. Dry edible beans blooming is estimated at 76 percent complete. Dry edible peas blooming is almost complete, with an estimated 95 percent of the crop bloomed, equal to the previous year. Pulse crop harvesting has begun earlier than last year, with an estimated 1 percent of the dry pea crop harvested. Durum wheat headed is estimated at 65 percent complete, behind the previous year of 70 percent. The Durum wheat crop has begun turning color, with an estimated 5 percent of the crop in the coloring stage. The oilseed crop continues to progress well, with an estimated 81 percent of the flaxseed crop blooming, and mustard seed blooming is estimated at 90 percent complete. Oats headed is estimated at 73 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 61 percent. Spring wheat headed is estimated at 81 percent complete, slightly ahead of the previous year at 79 percent. The first cutting for alfalfa and other hay is progressing well, despite rain delaying harvest in some areas. First cutting alfalfa is estimated at 75 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 65 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 86 percent. First cutting of other hay is estimated at 69 percent complete, ahead of the previous year at 59 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 83 percent. Winter wheat was reported with 81 percent of the crop turning color, ahead of the previous year at 66 percent, but behind the 5-year average of 88 percent. Harvest has begun for winter wheat, with an estimated 3 percent of the crop harvested, behind the 5-year average of 9 percent. Winter wheat conditions were rated as 84 percent good to excellent, compared to 52 percent this time last year.”

 

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2-row Malting Barley

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Canola in flowering state, a great crop in a wheat and barley rotation

 

Harvest has begun for winter wheat! Some of those early heading varieties like Brawl CL are really paying off this season. Another shocking figure is that winter wheat is at a 56% excellent rating. Which means “Yield prospects are above normal, and crops are experiencing little or no stress. Pastures are supplying feed more than what is normally expected at the current time of year”. This is great news as our acres were a bit down from last year. We are hoping there will be an export avenue for our top-notch malting barley crop this year, MWBC is optimistic.

 

 It is shocking how quickly the growing season in Montana is! I am sure for most farmers are feeling anxious to start knowing that any day a different weather pattern could throw them a curve ball. It is seeming like we are having a perfect end of July for the growing season, hot weather to get that little extra protein in the kernel and no hail or snow. The beauty of a rotation in our area is that often harvest is timed out between different varieties and crops. The challenge of a rotation is getting the timing right and getting it off the ground in time for fall planting. We hope that this harvest is prosperous and safe as our producers have been through enough in the last couple years, let us have an easy one for a change.

 

If you need help sourcing wheat and barley ingredients for your business, we would love to help. We will connect you with several options that provide numerous methods of delivery. All our wheat and barley suppliers can conduct negotiations virtually to fit your country or states regulations if needed, otherwise social distancing is not a problem out here =)

https://www.facebook.com/MontanaWheat/videos/3184647374906387/

-Sam Anderson

WBC@mt.gov

 

 

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